Tourism

Cultural Sites

Nan-Ying Zong-Ye Arts and Cultural Center

(1) Introduction:
Madou Zong-Ye's sugar plant used to be the headquarters of Mei-ji Sugar Company. Japanese entrepreneurs founded the Company in December of the 39th year of Emperor Mei-ji (1906) as a subsidiary of Mitsubishi Corporation. The Japanese then employed strong hand politics to forcibly acquire Madou Sugar Plant established by Lin Bo and his partners in the following year. Siaolong Sugar Plant was built another year later. Taiwan's sugar industry expanded greatly during that time, with sugarcane plantations rapidly increasing in area. Since Siaolong Sugar Plant reached its maximum processing limit, plans were made for additional sugar refineries and plants in the same area during the spring of the 43rd year of Emperor Mei-ji. In August of the same year, the Taiwan Sotokufu (Governor General's Of-fice) made plans to adjust the excessively large sugarcane fields of various sugar companies, as these fields may be vulnerable to reduction by other interests. To respond to the urgent need for new plants, the Governor General's Office finally chose Gouzaician Jhuang Zong-Ye of Tainan as the site for the new plant.
Under the supervision of technician Masaru Yasuda, construction for Madou Zong-Ye Sugar Factory began in September during the 43rd year of Emperor Mei-ji. By June of the following year, a total of 76 buildings such as the main office, repair facili-ty, parking lot, post office, clinic, club (guest house), and dormitories were completed. Infrastructure work began for Zong-Ye's Sugar Plant in the 43rd year of Emperor Mei-ji. Various systems were integrated in April of the following year. By December, mechanical integration of the boiler room, crystallisation room, sugar room, vacuum room, pressing room, and other machinery were completed. The plant became operational and started manufacturing sugar in January of the 45th year of Emperor Mei-ji. During the 5th and 6th year of Emperor Showa, sugar production volume of Mei-ji Sugar reached a record-breaking 2.62 million dan (131,000 tons). By working with Taiwan Seitou (Taiwan Sugar Manufacturing Company) and DaiNihon Seitou (Great Japan Sugar Manufacturing Company), Mei-ji Sugar became a leader in the sugar business. Mei-ji Sugar owned 3 sugar manufacturing offices in Japan, one in Shanghai, and 7 in Taiwan, namely Zong-Ye, Siaolong, Suantou, Nantou, Sihu, Nanjing, and Niaoshulin.
After World War II, various Japanese sugar companies in Taiwan were transferred to the Taiwan Executive Officer's Of-fice. In the following year, Mei-ji Sugar was restructured to become Tai Sugar's branch company in area 3, with the office still located within Madou Zong-Ye Sugar Plant. In July, 1950, the branch office was dissolved and renamed as Zong-Ye Sugar Plant, which incorporated sugar plants at Siaolong, Yujing, Wan-li, Sankandian, and Chelucian. In July, 1958, the company was again restructured and renamed as Ma-jia Headquarters, with the two plants at Zong-Ye and Siaolong combined under a single management.
In 1974, Ma-jia Headquarters was dissolved and renamed as Madou Sugar Plant. Taiwan's sugar industry has a long history of nearly 400 years, and can be traced back to the Dutch colonial era. For nearly three hundred years since the 17th century, sugar was a key commodity in world trade, not unlike crude oil in modern times. Madou happened to be one of the leading sugar production facility. Under Jheng Cheng-gong's and subsequent Cing Dynasty's administration, numerous sugar refineries were established in Madou that helped to create a prosperous sugar industry. Madou also had a port that facilitated sugar export, allowing local industry and commerce to grow and create a prosperous environment that would last for nearly three centuries. Madou Zong-Ye Sugar Plant was built during the 43rd year of Emperor Mei-ji (1910). During the Japanese occupation, the Zong-Ye Sugar Plant was a part of Mei-ji Sugar Company, which owned a total of 7 sugar plants in Taiwan. The company headquarter was established at Madou Zong-Ye Sugar Plant, giving the facility comprehensive planning, sizeable office buildings, and elegant landscaping. Sugar plants contributed greatly to Madou's prosperity. Zong-Ye Sugar Plant occupied an area of 37 hectares, of which 20 hectares were used for growing sugarcanes, 8 hectares were devoted to administration, and the remaining 9 hectares were used for sugar processing.
Madou Zong-Ye Sugar Plant is now located at Nanshih Village of Madou District. During the Japanese occupation, the plant was known as Zong-Ye and Gouzai Diyibao (1st Citadel at Gou-zai). In addition to the headquarters at Zong-Ye, the area of Chezailiao also had locations named after sugar plants, such as Sushenei (in the dormitories) and Huishehou (behind the company). Sugar plants have today become valuable cultural assets. On 19 November, 1999, the sugar plant was officially declared as a county-level landmark in order to commemorate its historical and cultural contributions and to acknowledge its value as a cul-tural asset. The office area has majestic and beautiful landscaping with one fig tree that is more than 100 years old, 36 fig trees that are over 90 years old, seven bishop wood trees (Bischofia javani-ca), two Indian almond trees (Terminalia catappa), one Amboine (Pterocarpus indicus) tree, as well as numerous longan and mango trees. This grove represents a rare natural resource that offers a perfect locale for recreational activities for the public. Because of corporate restructuring, Zong-Ye Sugar Plant is no longer profitable. Although the plant has been closed, the red brick office building (photograph 1), intricate wooden furniture at the guesthouse, the restaurant, and the plant intendant's residence, are considered representative pieces of Mei-ji architecture. Hence, the plant was formally listed as a county-level historical landmark in Tainan County. In December, 2000, with the support of Tainan County's cultural bureau, our hardworking Town Mayor, and experienced Township Office team, it was possible to integrate local arts, cultural, music, and community. Social groups and professionals also developed an initial plan for developing and utilising idle areas. The site was renamed as Nan-Ying Zong-Ye Arts and Cultural Center and would be used to host cultural and art events with support from the Cultural Affairs Department.
(2) Address: No. 5, Zong-Ye, Nanshih Village, Madou District, Tainan City
(3) Telephone: 06-5718123, 5718088
(4) Opening hours:
◇ The park is open all day
4 historical exhibits and Yen Shui-long Memorial Hall
◇ Wednesday to Friday: 9 AM to 12 Noon; 1 PM to 5 PM
Saturdays and Sundays 9 AM to 5 PM
(closed on Mondays, Tuesdays, and Chinese New Year Eve)

Nan-Ying Tsung-Yeh Arts and Cultural Center
Nan-Ying Tsung-Yeh Arts and Cultural Center
Nan-Ying Tsung-Yeh Arts and Cultural Center
Nan-Ying Tsung-Yeh Arts and Cultural Center
Nan-Ying Tsung-Yeh Arts and Cultural Center
Nan-Ying Tsung-Yeh Arts and Cultural Center
Nan-Ying Tsung-Yeh Arts and Cultural Center
Nan-Ying Tsung-Yeh Arts and Cultural Center

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